Box Adventures by Natalie Bloomfield

“Box Adventures” started out as only two images for a class assignment at my first semester at MICA. Though the parameters of the assignment escape me, I remember my reasoning behind it. Earlier I had found a decent sized, empty cardboard box at my work, destined to be thrown away. And I knew I just had to use it for something, so I saved it. I kept it in the trunk of my car for weeks, maybe even months, until I got the assignment from my class.
-Natalie Bloomfield

Box Adventures

_Box Adventures__4

I wanted to show what imagination can do within our daily lives that are filled with chores and things to do. With just a bit of imagination, a box can more than just a box, it can be anything we want it to be, any vehicle we want to take us to any place imaginable. I used Photoshop to illustrate this transitional phase between reality and fantasy. I gave myself certain parameters for each image. For each image I chose a location and prop that would hint to some sort of chore being done (like babysitting, sweeping, racking the leaves, taking out the trash, cleaning my room, walking the dogs, or walking to school.) And for each image I slightly overlaid some other elements using Photoshop to indicate I was daydreaming of something else.
-Natalie Bloomfield

_Box Adventures__2

_Box Adventures__1

First of all as a young child my siblings and I always loved to play with cardboard boxes. We would make robots, houses, and many other things out of them. So when I found the box, it for some reason reminded me of my childhood. I am a daydreamer even to this day, and when I was younger I could live in my own head for hours. I can get distracted easily sometimes. This entire series shows a situation where there is a chore to be done, and the main character (me) of the series gets distracted and imagines she is somewhere else.
-Natalie Bloomfield

Box Adventures

Natalie Bloomfield

My work is mainly narrative, One of my goals in my work is to make a place of my own – a place dominated by beautiful colors and spectacular light and where anything can happen and everything is possible. I love to create photos that defy reality and go beyond what we think is possible. I’ve never been good at communicating with people, or explaining how I feel, so I like my photos to talk for me, since I can’t. I want to create work that reflects my world, where my thoughts, feelings, and experiences in my life are expressed.
-Natalie Bloomfield

Natalie Bloomfield

The people of Flickr are the people who inspire me most. The photographers I started following on Flickr when I first join I still follow to this day. Whenever I am in search of inspiration or motivation I go to Flickr. Another inspiration is children’s books actually. I really appreciate a well thought-out children’s book. I used to work for a toy store and would read the children’s books there when things were slow. Authors like Mo Willems and Harper Collins really inspire me.
-Natalie Bloomfield

Natalie Bloomfield

The times I feel most stuck with my art is when I isolate myself. When I stop looking at other artist’s works or don’t go outside enough. I’ve found out that being in a community of artists is not only encouraging, it’s insanely inspiring. I used a full frame canon 6D and love using my 1.4 50mm lens. Another key aspect to my work is Photoshop.
-Natalie Bloomfield

About Natalie Bloomfield

Natalie Bloomfield was born and raised in Maryland her whole life, living between Baltimore and Annapolis. On her 16th birthday, her mother bought her a little point and shoot camera so she could take pictures of her friends having fun and whatnot. She found herself taking pictures of pretty much everything else, experimenting with what she could do with the camera. She discovered Flickr, which was the most impactful, influential aspect of my photography career. For the first time ever, she discovered that photography could be conceptual and could be used to create narratives. She found out that photography was therapeutic for her, a way of coping. She attributed her style and what subject matter she shoot to Flickr even to this day. Natalie started taking college photography classes at the local community college while she was in high school, and transferred to Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) in Baltimore and recently graduated in May. See more of her works on Behance or her website.